MSC Southeast - MnTC Package

Liberal Arts & Sciences

Minnesota Transfer Curriculum Package

The Minnesota Transfer Curriculum is the means by which a student transfers a complete package of lower division general education from one Minnesota State institution to another.  At Minnesota State College Southeast this is accomplished by a minimum of 40 credits with course requirements in each of the 10 goal areas as designated below.  

  • If a course is eligible for multiple goals, the additional goal(s) is listed in in the right hand column, however, credits for any course may count only once towards the minimum 40 credits.
  • Students must maintain a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.0 to transfer this package. The MnTC grade point average will be calculated using grades of A – D (passing grades earned) in all MnTC courses, including both MSC Southeast and transfer grades
  • Download a Transfer Curriculum Program Plan (PDF)
Note: An asterisk (*) before the name of a course below indicates that the course is offered online.

Goal 1: Communication

To develop writers and speakers who use the English language effectively and who read, write, speak, and listen critically. As a base, all students should complete introductory communication requirements early in their collegiate studies. Writing competency is an ongoing process to be reinforced through writing-intensive courses and writing across the curriculum. Speaking and listening skills need reinforcement through multiple opportunities for interpersonal communication, public speaking, and discussion.
You need a minimum of 9 credits to meet Goal 1. These must include:

  • College Speech (COMM1218) OR Interpersonal Communications (COMM1228)
  • College Writing I (ENGL1215)
  • College Writing II (ENGL2525)
Goal 1 Courses (9 credits)
COMM1218*College Speech (3 credits)
Students develop interpersonal, small group, and public speaking skills as well as an understanding of basic communication principles. (Fulfills MnTC Goal 1) (Prerequisite: none) (3 credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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COMM1228*Interpersonal Communications (3 credits)
This course focuses on the practical and theoretical interpersonal communication skills needful in the personal, public, and professional contexts found within a diverse society. This course addresses subject matter, such as communication theory, verbal and non-verbal communication, intercultural and cultural communication, communication modes, communication styles, the language of conflict management/resolution, active listening, language choice, and perception. (Meets MnTC Goal 1 and Goal 7) (Prerequisites: A minimum score of 78 in the Reading Comprehension portion of the Accuplacer Basic Skills test, or a minimum score of 21 in the Reading Subject area of the ACT test, or successful completion of ENGL 0528) (3 credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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Also Goal 7
COMM1420*Social Media Communications (3 credits)
This course explores the ways in which social media influences interactions among people in the digital realm. Students will create content using a variety of common social media applications and multi-media, including online writing, listening, and speaking. Students will investigate the development of online communities and increase their knowledge of online rhetoric, the use of analytic tools for audience research and engagement, planning for media events, and evaluation of social media applications. Students will identify, discuss, and reflect upon the ethical dimensions of political, social, and personal life and the ways in which they can exercise responsible and productive citizenship. Meets MnTC Goals 1 & 9. (Prerequisite: none) (3 credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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Also Goal 9
ENGL1215*College Writing I (3 credits)
This course involves expository writing based on experience, direct observation, research and reading with emphasis on critical thinking skills, rhetorical strategies, and style. (Meets MnTC Goal 1) (Prerequisites: A minimum score of 78 on the Reading Comprehension portion of the ACCUPLACER basic skills test or a minimum score of 18 on the English subject area of the ACT test or successful completion of ENGL0528) (3 Credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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ENGL1410*Technical Writing (3 credits)
This course studies the theory and practice of technical writing emphasizing clarity and conciseness in written communication for practical and professional purposes.(Meets MnTC Goal 1)(Prerequisite: A minimum score of 78 on the Reading Comprehension portion of the ACCUPLACER basic skills test or a minimum score of 18 on the English subject area of the ACT test or successful completion of ENGL0528) (3 Credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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ENGL1445*Introduction to Creative Writing (3 credits)
This course will serve to introduce the student to the practice of creative writing, specifically to the techniques involved in writing poetry and short fiction. In addition to writing their own poems and stories, students will read and discuss a number of contemporary examples in these genres. (Meets MnTC goals 1 & 6) (Prerequisites: A minimum score of 78 on the Reading Comprehension portion of the ACCUPLACER basic skills test or a minimum score of 18 on the English subject area of the ACT test or successful completion of ENGL0528) (3 credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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Also Goal 6
ENGL2525*College Writing II (3 credits)
Reading critically and writing persuasively from multiple sources is emphasized. Students will evaluate the stylistic, structural and substantive merits of what they read; they will analyze and synthesize various points of view, develop interpretive skills, and employ various critical stances and techniques. Students must write at least one research paper substantially based on the reading of at least one book-length text (assigned to the whole class by the instructor). The text may be fictional, non-fictional, dramatic, or poetic. Students will write at least three academic essays of analysis and/or synthesis. (MN Transfer Goals 1 and 2) (Prerequisites: "C" or better in ENGL2515 College Writing I, ENGL2545 Introduction to Creative Writing, or equivalent course transfer) (3 credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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Also Goal 2
ENGL2595Special Topics in Writing (3 credits)
This course will offer students the opportunity to write in a specific genre (e.g. poetry, memoir, drama, screenplay, literary journalism, short fiction, creative nonfiction, writing for the Web, professional writing, writing in organizations, etc.) in each semester that it is offered. Offered irregularly. (Meets MnTC goal 1) (Prerequisite: A minimum score of 78 on the Reading Comprehension portion of the ACCUPLACER basic skills test or a minimum score of 18 on the English subject area of the ACT test or successful completion of ENGL0528) (3 credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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Goal 2: Critical Thinking

To develop thinkers who are able to unify factual, creative, rational, and value-sensitive modes of thought. Critical thinking will be taught and used throughout the general education curriculum in order to develop students' awareness of their own thinking and problem-solving procedures. To integrate new skills into their customary ways of thinking, students must be actively engaged in practicing thinking skills and applying them to open-ended problems.
Goal 2 is met once the other 9 MnTC Goals are completed and you have taken 40 MnTC credits.
Goal 2 Courses (Met when other MnTC goals are complete)
ARTS1222*Introduction to Graphic Design (3 credits)
This introductory course provides an overview of various industry-standard software applications used in graphic design. Students will apply visual communication strategies and creative and effective design elements and layouts. The course will focus on fundamental design concepts and historical design styles relating to text and image interaction. Students will develop various types of graphic designs to include typography, color, illustration, symbols, and photography. Prior knowledge of Adobe InDesign and Photoshop is recommended, but not required, for this course. Adobe InDesign and Adobe Photoshop (Creative Suite 6 or Creative Cloud Complete) are required applications for those taking this course online. (Meets MnTC Goal 2 and Goal 6) (Prerequisites: none) (3 credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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Also Goal 6
BIOL1226*Nutrition (3 credits)
This course covers basic principles of nutrition and their relationship to human health and normal biological function. Students are exposed to current trends in nutrition, behaviors typical of a positive nutritional lifestyle, and a lab like experience to evaluate their own nutritional status. Topics covered include an introduction to the nutrients, digestive function and metabolism, the role of physical activity, dietary standards, proper diet planning, and nutrition related diseases. (Meets MnTC Goals 2 & 3) (Prerequisite: none) (3 credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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Also Goal 3
BIOL2512*Human Physiology (4 credits)
This course is intended to follow BIOL 2511 (Human Anatomy) and provides a detailed examination of the anatomical structures, physiological processes, cellular and molecular makeup, and medical terminology relating to the major organ systems of the body introduced in BIOL 2511 (Human Anatomy). (Meets MnTC Goals 2 & 3) (Prerequisite: BIOL2511) (4 Credits: 3 lecture/1 lab)

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Also Goal 3
BIOL2515*Anatomy & Physiology I (4 credits)
Human Anatomy and Physiology I introduces the structure and function of the human body with an emphasis on normal health. This course includes a review of cellular biology, cellular transport, cell reproduction and basic biochemistry. Topics covered include tissues, the integumentary system, skeletal system, articulations, muscular system, and nervous system. (MnTC Goals 2 & 3) (Prerequisite: Recent High School Biology or NATS 0510 or equivalent) (4 credits: 3 lecture/1 lab)

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Also Goal 3
BIOL2516*Anatomy & Physiology II (4 credits)
Human Anatomy and Physiology II continues the study of the human body from Human Anatomy and Physiology I. This course includes principles of chemistry, biochemistry, and molecular biology as they relate to the study of normal body function. Topics covered include the endocrine system, cardiovascular system, immune system, respiratory system, urinary system, digestive system, and reproductive systems. (MnTC Goals 2 & 3) (Prerequisite: Successful completion of BIOL2515 Anatomy & Physiology I) (4 credits: 3 lecture/1 lab)

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Also Goal 3
CHEM2518*General, Organic & Biochemistry I (4 credits)
This course is intended as a broad introduction to the basic principles of general, organic, and biochemistry. Atomic structure, radioactivity, ionic and covalent compounds, reactions, oxidation-reduction, solutions, acids and bases are covered through descriptive, theoretical, and laboratory topics. These principles are related to organic and biological chemistry throughout the course as it is a foundational course for students enrolled in the health related programs. However, this course is open to all students enrolled in any program. (Fulfills MnTC Goal 2 & 3) (Prerequisites: Recent High School Chemistry or CHEM0510 or equivalent) (4 credits: 3 lecture/1 lab)

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Also Goal 3
ENGL2525*College Writing II (3 credits)
Reading critically and writing persuasively from multiple sources is emphasized. Students will evaluate the stylistic, structural and substantive merits of what they read; they will analyze and synthesize various points of view, develop interpretive skills, and employ various critical stances and techniques. Students must write at least one research paper substantially based on the reading of at least one book-length text (assigned to the whole class by the instructor). The text may be fictional, non-fictional, dramatic, or poetic. Students will write at least three academic essays of analysis and/or synthesis. (MN Transfer Goals 1 and 2) (Prerequisites: "C" or better in ENGL2515 College Writing I, ENGL2545 Introduction to Creative Writing, or equivalent course transfer) (3 credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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Also Goal 1
ENGL2580Independent Reading: The Great Books (3 credits)
Independent Reading: The Great Books allows students to choose books to read from a list provided by the instructor and discuss them in one-on-one meetings with the instructor and/or in small group meetings with other students and the instructor. The course may be conducted on campus or through electronic delivery (by discretion of instructor). The focus of the course will be on classic literary texts; however, books which are historical, political, philosophical, or representative of other disciplines may be used, though they should be ones accessible to skilled readers from outside those disciplines. Note: This course does not involve regular class meetings; rather, students must arrange meetings with the instructor. (MnTC Goals 2 and 6) (Prerequisite: A minimum score of 78 in the Reading Comprehension portion of the ACCUPLACER basic skills test or a minimum score of 21 in the Reading Subject area of the ACT test or successful completion of ENGL0528) (3 credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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Also Goal 6
PSYC2520Psychology of Human Sexuality (3 credits)
Psychology of Human Sexuality is an overview of theories, research and contemporary issues in human sexual behavior. Topics include psychosexual development, gender roles, sexual orientation, sexual anatomy, alternate methods of reproduction, pregnancy/birth, contraception, sexually transmitted diseases, sex education, sexism, love and attraction, sexual abuse, sexual dysfunctions, sex therapy, paraphilia, and sexuality through the life cycle. (Meets MnTC Goals 2 & 5) (Prerequisite: None) (3 credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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Also Goal 5

Goal 3: Natural Science

To improve students' understanding of natural science principles and of the methods of scientific inquiry, i.e, the ways in which scientists investigate natural science phenomena. As a basis for lifelong learning, students need to know the vocabulary of science and to realize that while a set of principles has been developed through the work of previous scientists, ongoing scientific inquiry and new knowledge will bring changes in some of the ways scientists view the world. By studying the problems that engage today's scientists, students learn to appreciate the importance of science in their lives and to understand the value of a scientific perspective. Students should be encouraged to study both the biological and physical sciences.
You need 6-8 credits to meet Goal 3. You must select two science courses from at least two different subject areas. One course must have a traditional lab and the other must have a traditional lab or lab-like experience.
Goal 3 Courses (6-8 credits)
BIOL1120*Environmental Science (3 credits)
Environmental Science introduces the relationship between human populations and their surroundings through the use of course assignments, discussions, virtual labs and/or lab like experiences. Students explore core scientific concepts and the impact of past, present, and future human behavior on the environment. An emphasis is placed on how current practices, policies, and individual behavior impact both the local and global environment. (Meets MnTC goals 3 & 10) (Prerequisite: none) (3 Credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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Also Goal 10
BIOL1200*Human Biology (4 credits)
Human Biology is a one-semester survey of general human function and interactions in a biological world. Cell and organ system functions are described in the context of normal health. The basic ecological principles that describe human interactions with their environment will also be covered. (MnTC Goal 3) (Prerequisite: none) (4 credits: 3 lecture/1 lab)

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BIOL1201*Introduction to Biology (4 credits)
Introduction to Biology will serve as an overview of the principles and theories that drive the study of biology. Students will be exposed to several different disciplines within biology, including but not limited to, molecular and cell biology, genetics, evolutionary biology, and ecology. An emphasis will be placed on relationships between biology and current issues of particular interest to students. (Meets MnTC Goals 3 & 10) (Prerequisite: none) (4 Credits: 3 lecture/1 lab)

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Also Goal 10
BIOL1226*Nutrition (3 credits)
This course covers basic principles of nutrition and their relationship to human health and normal biological function. Students are exposed to current trends in nutrition, behaviors typical of a positive nutritional lifestyle, and a lab like experience to evaluate their own nutritional status. Topics covered include an introduction to the nutrients, digestive function and metabolism, the role of physical activity, dietary standards, proper diet planning, and nutrition related diseases. (Meets MnTC Goals 2 & 3) (Prerequisite: none) (3 credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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Also Goal 2
BIOL2512*Human Physiology (4 credits)
This course is intended to follow BIOL 2511 (Human Anatomy) and provides a detailed examination of the anatomical structures, physiological processes, cellular and molecular makeup, and medical terminology relating to the major organ systems of the body introduced in BIOL 2511 (Human Anatomy). (Meets MnTC Goals 2 & 3) (Prerequisite: BIOL2511) (4 Credits: 3 lecture/1 lab)

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Also Goal 2
BIOL2515*Anatomy & Physiology I (4 credits)
Human Anatomy and Physiology I introduces the structure and function of the human body with an emphasis on normal health. This course includes a review of cellular biology, cellular transport, cell reproduction and basic biochemistry. Topics covered include tissues, the integumentary system, skeletal system, articulations, muscular system, and nervous system. (MnTC Goals 2 & 3) (Prerequisite: Recent High School Biology or NATS 0510 or equivalent) (4 credits: 3 lecture/1 lab)

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Also Goal 2
BIOL2516*Anatomy & Physiology II (4 credits)
Human Anatomy and Physiology II continues the study of the human body from Human Anatomy and Physiology I. This course includes principles of chemistry, biochemistry, and molecular biology as they relate to the study of normal body function. Topics covered include the endocrine system, cardiovascular system, immune system, respiratory system, urinary system, digestive system, and reproductive systems. (MnTC Goals 2 & 3) (Prerequisite: Successful completion of BIOL2515 Anatomy & Physiology I) (4 credits: 3 lecture/1 lab)

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Also Goal 2
BIOL2530Microbiology (4 credits)
Microbiology explores the characteristics, classification, and pathology of microscopic organisms. Mechanisms of microbial growth, reproduction, and metabolism, are explored with relation to the role they play in human health, disease, and immunity. Basic laboratory procedures, such as staining techniques, nutrient preparation, microbial isolation, and microorganism identification are covered in the laboratory component of this course. (Fulfills MnTC goal 3) (Prerequisite: CHEM 2518 or BIOL 2512 or equivalent) (4 Credits: 3 lecture/1 lab)

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BIOL2531*Microbiology (3 credits)
Microbiology explores the general characteristics, classification, and pathology of microscopic organisms. Fundamental aspects of microbial control, growth, reproduction, and metabolism, are explored with relation to the role they play in human health, disease, and immunity. Basic laboratory procedures, such as staining techniques, nutrient preparation, microbial isolation, and microorganism identification are introduced in the laboratory component of this course. (Fulfills MnTC goal 3) (Prerequisite: CHEM2518 or BIOL2512 or equivalent) (3 credits: 2 lecture/1 lab)

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CHEM1110*Survey of Chemistry (4 credits)
As a one-semester introduction to the field of chemistry this course is designed to allow students to understand how chemistry relates to everyday life by looking at classification of matter, reactivity, solutions and organic compounds. This course is intended for non-science majors interested in early childhood education or students wanting an introduction to the field of chemistry and does not require previous experience in chemistry. (MnTC goal 3) (Prerequisite: none) (4 credits: 3 lecture/1 lab)

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CHEM1122Environmental Chemistry (3 credits)
Environmental Chemistry introduces non-science students to the world of chemical processes, both natural and artificial, in their daily experiences. These phenomenon are related to current environmental issues in the context of human activities and influences. Topics discussed include air pollution, ozone depletion, global warming, acid rain, nuclear power issues, energy sources and the impact recycling has on our environment. (Meets MnTC Goals 3 & 10) (Prerequisite: none) (3 credits: 2 lecture/1 lab)

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Also Goal 10
CHEM1225Introduction to Forensic Science (3 credits)
This chemistry course will explore the scientific basis and background for crime-scene investigations. Students will explore the entire field of forensic science, including the different kinds of physical evidence, collection, preservation, and proper analysis of evidence, current technologies and techniques used to examine evidence, interpretation of results from a variety of forensic-laboratory analyses, and the ethical implications of using forensic data in a case. Students will perform several laboratory experiments to learn some data analysis techniques. (Meets MnTC Goals 3 & 9) (Prerequisite: none) (3 credits: 2 lecture/1 lab)

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Also Goal 9
CHEM2518*General, Organic & Biochemistry I (4 credits)
This course is intended as a broad introduction to the basic principles of general, organic, and biochemistry. Atomic structure, radioactivity, ionic and covalent compounds, reactions, oxidation-reduction, solutions, acids and bases are covered through descriptive, theoretical, and laboratory topics. These principles are related to organic and biological chemistry throughout the course as it is a foundational course for students enrolled in the health related programs. However, this course is open to all students enrolled in any program. (Fulfills MnTC Goal 2 & 3) (Prerequisites: Recent High School Chemistry or CHEM0510 or equivalent) (4 credits: 3 lecture/1 lab)

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Also Goal 2
PHYS1215*College Physics I (4 credits)
This non-calculus based course introduces the basic principles of physics through applications, problems, and experiments. Newtonian motion and conservation laws for linear and circular motion will be covered including speed, velocity, and acceleration for linear and projectile motion. Oscillatory motion will be covered including mechanical, light, sound and energy waves. Thermodynamics will be introduced including the first and second law of thermodynamics. (Meets MnTC Goal 3) (Prerequisite: A minimum score of 22 in the math subject area of the ACT test or successful completion of MATH1025 Algebra) (4 credits: 3 lecture/1 lab)

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Goal 4: Mathematical/Logical Reasoning

To increase students' knowledge about mathematical and logical modes of thinking. This will enable students to appreciate the breadth of applications of mathematics, evaluate arguments, and detect fallacious reasoning. Students will learn to apply mathematics, logic, and/or statistics to help them make decisions in their lives and careers. Minnesota's public higher education systems have agreed that developmental mathematics includes the first three years of a high school mathematics sequence through intermediate algebra.
You need at least one 3-credit course to meet Goal 4.
Goal 4 Courses (3 credits)
MATH1090STATWAY Statistics 2 (4 credits)
This course is the second in a two-semester statistics sequence. Students progress through topics in both algebra and college-level introductory statistics in one year. Statway 2 covers sampling distributions, Central Limit Theorems, confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing for population proportions, population means, and means of paired differences. Chi-square tests for one and two way tables and ANOVA methods are covered, as well as topics from algebra. This curriculum is based on student collaborative group learning. Students must commit to completing Math 0990 in the Fall semester and Math 1090 in the following Spring semester. Completion of the 2 course sequence satisfies MnTC Goal 4. (Prerequisite: MATH0990) (4 credits: 4 lecture/0 lab)

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MATH1220*College Algebra (3 credits)
This course covers functions, graphs, exponents and logarithms, inequalities, application problems, matrices and determinants, sequences and series, and the binomial theorem. (Fulfills MnTC Goal 4) (Prerequisite: A minimum score of 50 in the college level math section of the ACCUPLACER basic skills test or a minimum score of 22 on the math subject area of the ACT test or successful completion of MATH1025) (3 credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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MATH1225Pre-Calculus (3 credits)
Pre-calculus is designed to increase students' knowledge about mathematical and logical modes of thinking and will provide students the skills necessary for the successful completion of calculus. Topics include polymonials and rational functions; exponential and logarithmic functions; trigonometric functions of real numbers and angles; analytical trigonometry; polar coordinates and vectors; and sequences and series. Pre-calculus is a Minnesota Transfer Level Course. (Meets MnTC Goal 4) (Prerequisite: A minimum score of 50 in the college level math section of the ACCUPLACER basic skills test or a minimum score of 22 on the math subject area of the ACT test or successful completion of MATH1025) (3 credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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MATH1230*Introduction to Statistics (3 credits)
This course emphasizes the concepts and methods of statistics. Statistics is the study of how to collect, organize, analyze, and interpret numerical information from data. Statistical methods will be presented with a focus on understanding both the suitability of the method and the meaning of the result. Statistical methods and measurements will be studied in the context of a broad range of practical applications that require decision making. (MnTC Goal 4) (Prerequisite: A minimum score of 50 in the college level math section of the ACCUPLACER basic skills test or a minimum score of 22 on the math subject area of the ACT test or successful completion of MATH1025 or MATH1020 or MATH1015) (3 credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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Goal 5: Hist/Soc/Behav Sci

To increase students knowledge of how historians and social and behavioral scientists discover, describe, and explain the behaviors and interactions among individuals, groups, institutions, events, and ideas. Such knowledge will better equip students to understand themselves and the roles they play in addressing the issues facing humanity.
You need a minimum of 9 credits to meet Goal 5. You must take three courses from at least two different subject areas.
Goal 5 Courses (9 credits)
ECON1405*Personal Finance (3 credits)
Personal Finance offers a study of economic decisions facing individuals in their personal lives. The course includes such topics as budgeting, using consumer credit, buying or renting a home, providing for medical care, purchasing life insurance, understanding retirement programs, buying and selling stocks, preparing income tax returns, minimizing taxes, and thinking about consumerism. (Prerequisites: none) (MnTC Goals 5 and 9) (3 credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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Also Goal 9
GEOG1115*World Regional Geography (3 credits)
This course will present an introduction to the physical, economic, political, cultural, and demographic characteristics of world regions. Particular emphasis is placed on spatial (geographic) relationships and principles that impact the formation of economies and cultures, on settlement and land use patterns, population distribution, commerce and industry, language, religion, and political alliances. (MnTC Goals 5 and 8) (Prerequisite: none) (3 credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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Also Goal 8
HIST1105*Western Civilization to 1500 (3 credits)
This course will investigate the beginnings of Western Civilization through the Renaissance and explore the creation and development of its social, political, economic, and philosophical traditions. A variety of topics and areas will be discussed which could include earliest civilizations, Hebrews, Greeks, Romans, and medieval Europe. Students will learn about how unique development by these societies has shaped and formed our current society today. (Meets MnTC Goals 5 & 8) (Prerequisites: none) (3 credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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Also Goal 8
HIST1108U.S. History to 1865 (3 credits)
HIST 1108 is a history of the political, social, economic, and cultural history of the United States to 1865. This class will discuss the development of the United States and the interactions of different peoples and groups. Even more importantly, this course will offer historical perspectives into the formation of todays society as we discuss how political, social, economic, cultural, and technological changes have impacted both the past and the present. (Meets MnTC Goals 5 & 7). (Prerequisites: none) (3 credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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Also Goal 7
HIST1110*U.S. History: 1865 to Present (3 credits)
The objectives for this course will be to give the student a broader and deeper understanding of American history from the end of the Civil War in 1865 to the present day. Even more importantly, this course will offer historical perspectives into the formation of todays society as we discuss how political, social, economic, cultural, and technological changes have impacted both the past and the present. (MnTC goals 5 & 7) (Prerequisite: none) (3 credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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Also Goal 7
HIST1230*World Civilization: 1500 CE - Present (3 credits)
HIST1230 presents a history of political, social, economic, and cultural history of the world from 1500 to present. This class will discuss the development of the worlds civilizations and the interactions of different peoples and societies. The class will look at how the worlds history has shaped not only our own history but also how the world has moved toward a more interdependent present. (Meets MnTC Goals 5 & 8) (Prerequisites: none) (3 credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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Also Goal 8
HIST2515American Music History (3 credits)
American music history will focus on the economic and social changes that have shaped and also been shaped by the nation¿s unique musical history. As each era¿s music reveals many of the most significant changes of our history, a study of the varying musical styles will give insight into the complexity of our multicultural American past. This class will examine how the music of each era is symbolic of the historical circumstances of the time. Students will be able to describe the musical styles of the time periods and also the historical factors associated with the music. (MnTC goals 5 & 7) (Prerequisite: None) (3 credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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Also Goal 7
HIST2525*Minnesota History (3 credits)
This course is a survey of Minnesota's historical development from the pre-Columbian period to the present. It focuses on the historic importance of Minnesota's geography and natural resources, American Indian-white relations, the development of Minnesota's unique political tradition, and the emergence of Minnesota's diverse society and economy. (MnTC Goal 5 & 10) (Prerequisites: None) (3 credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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Also Goal 10
HIST2535History of the American Indian (3 credits)
This course will investigate the inhabitants of continental America before, during, and after the arrival of Europeans. An in-depth analysis of different Indian societies and how they were affected by their environment, social, economic, and political realities of their time. Students will look at their own pre-knowledge of Indian societies and will check it for misconceptions or generalizations that may or may not be true. Students will also learn to research and investigate historical topics related to American Indians through the use of historical research techniques. (Meets MnTC Goals 5 & 7) (Prerequisties: None) (3 credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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Also Goal 7
POLS1101*Introduction to Political Science (3 credits)
An introduction to the basic terms, concepts, principles, and structures of modern political systems worldwide. Problems and issues arising from various political systems, such as democracy, communism, socialism, and totalitarianism will also be studied. (Fulfills MnTC Goals 5 & 9) (Prerequisite: none) (3 credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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Also Goal 9
POLS1120*American Government (3 credits)
A survey of the basic structure and operation of the American National Government, with emphasis on the core ideas and values that underlie it. Topics will include citizen participation, political parties, interest groups, the Presidency, Congress, and Federal Courts. (Fulfills MN Transfer Curriculum Goals 5 & 9) (Prerequisite: none) (3 credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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Also Goal 9
PSYC1110*Introduction to Psychology (3 credits)
Psychology applies to everyone's personal and workplace daily life. In this course, you will be introduced to the history of psychology, consciousness, learning theories, memory, problem-solving, intelligence, motivation, life-span development, personality, abnormal psychology and therapy. (Fulfills MnTC Goal 5 & 7) (Prerequisite: none) (3 credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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Also Goal 7
PSYC1115*Lifespan Development (3 credits)
Students will explore theories of human development to understand the connections and relationships of stages of growth from conception to late adulthood. Genetics; prenatal development and birth; physical, cognitive and psychosocial development from birth through late adulthood; and dying, death, and bereavement will be examined. (Fulfills MnTC Goals 5 and 7) (Prerequisite: none) (3 credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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Also Goal 7
PSYC1223*Psychology of Death and Dying (3 credits)
This course examines death and dying in terms of current and historical viewpoints and the effect of individual and cultural attitudes and rituals. Medicolegal movements and issues, and factors such as age, culture, spirituality, and manner of death will be investigated and how those issues shape end-of-life and grief experiences. (Fulfills MnTC Goals 5 and 9) (Prerequisite: none) (3 credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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Also Goal 9
PSYC2520Psychology of Human Sexuality (3 credits)
Psychology of Human Sexuality is an overview of theories, research and contemporary issues in human sexual behavior. Topics include psychosexual development, gender roles, sexual orientation, sexual anatomy, alternate methods of reproduction, pregnancy/birth, contraception, sexually transmitted diseases, sex education, sexism, love and attraction, sexual abuse, sexual dysfunctions, sex therapy, paraphilia, and sexuality through the life cycle. (Meets MnTC Goals 2 & 5) (Prerequisite: None) (3 credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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Also Goal 2
PSYC2522*Positive Psychology (3 credits)
This course explores theories and research on positive human qualities and strengths, and how to utilize these for personal and community well-being. The interaction of psychological, sociological, and biological factors that shape well-being are discussed. The information in this course will be applied toward life areas such as work, leisure, relationships, health, and society. (MnTC Goals 5 and 9) (Prerequisite: PSYC1110 General Psychology) (3 credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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Also Goal 9
PSYC2526*Abnormal Psychology (3 credits)
Abnormal Psychology explores in greater depth the psychological disorders that are introduced in General Psychology. Students will examine diagnostic criteria, etiology, prevalence rates, age of onset, and treatments for psychological disorders included in the DSM-V. Social, ethical, cultural, and legal issues that are relevant to the mental health field will also be discussed. (Meets MnTC Goals 5 & 7) (Prerequisite: PSYC1110 Introduction to Psychology) (3 credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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Also Goal 7
PSYC2531*Social Psychology (3 credits)
This course provides learners with an introduction to the scientific study of how a person's emotions, thoughts, and behaviors are influenced by other people. Students will become familiar with theories, research methods, and applications of social psychology to their own lives. Among the issues to be addressed are group processes, aggression, conformity, attraction, attitude change, and prejudice. Findings regarding gender, racial, and cultural similarities and differences will be covered as well. (Fulfills MnTC Goals 5 and 7) (Prerequisite: PSYC1110 Introduction to Psychology or SOCS1110 Introduction to Sociology) (3 credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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Also Goal 7
PSYC2533Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences (4 credits)
Students will become familiar with the concepts and statistical procedures commonly used in the behavioral sciences, choosing appropriate statistical tests, and interpreting and writing APA-style research results. Use of a statistical software package will be performed as the lab component of the course. (Fulfills MnTC Goal 5) (Prerequisite: PSYC1110 AND completion of Math MnTC requirement, with MATH1230 Introduction to Statistics strongly recommended) (4 credits: 3 lecture/1 lab)

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SOCS1110*Introduction to Sociology (3 credits)
The purpose of this course is to develop in students an understanding of basic sociological issues, concepts, terminology, and applications of these understandings with current societal events. Students will become conscious of societal influences in relationship to human and cultural dynamics in our world. This course will call for the development of reflective and critical thinking skills. (MnTC Goal 5) (Prerequisite: none) (3 credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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Also Goal 7
SOCS1205*Sociology of the Family (3 credits)
The purpose of this course is to offer a comprehensive study of the forces external to and within the contemporary Western social institution that we call 'the family'. Current sociological theories and research will be used to study American family structure and functions. Cross-cultural comparisons; family dynamics; disorganization; and change will be included. The course will provide a forum to expose the students to the vast changes that have taken and continue to take place in marriages and family enabling them to make choices in a diverse society. (MnTC Goals 5 & 7) (Prerequisite: none) (3 credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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Also Goal 7
SOCS2525*Social Deviance (3 credits)
Sociology of deviant behavior will use sociological perspective to examine how society has defined deviance; in addition, how laws and sanctions have been adopted to discourage deviant behavior. Another goal of the course is to understand the various theories of deviance developed by professionals such as sociologists and criminologists; comparing and contrasting each disciplines interpretation as they explain the causes and effects of deviant behavior. Deviance such as terrorism, political crime, and cultural and social reactions to deviance will also be explored utilizing the most current scientific research methodologies to examine the direct and indirect societal cost of these forms of behavior. (Meets MnTC Goal 5) (Prerequisite: none) (3 credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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Goal 6: Humanities/Fine Arts

To expand students' knowledge of the human condition and human cultures, especially in relation to behavior, ideas, and values expressed in works of human imagination and thought. Through study in disciplines such as literature, philosophy, and the fine arts, students will engage in critical analysis, form aesthetic judgments, and develop an appreciation of the arts and humanities as fundamental to the health and survival of any society. Students should have experiences in both the arts and humanities.
You need a minimum of 9 credits to meet Goal 6. You must take three courses from at least two different subject areas.
Goal 6 Courses (9 credits)
ARTS1101*Introduction to the Arts (3 credits)
The purpose of this course is to develop in students an appreciation of the arts as a vital element in understanding the human condition and to expose the students to various art forms. Students will explore the relationships between the artist, the artwork, the audience, and society. The students will engage in critical analysis of various forms of art to help them form aesthetics judgments. Attendance at arts events is a requirement of the course. (Meets MnTC Goal 6) (Prerequisite: none) (3 credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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ARTS1222*Introduction to Graphic Design (3 credits)
This introductory course provides an overview of various industry-standard software applications used in graphic design. Students will apply visual communication strategies and creative and effective design elements and layouts. The course will focus on fundamental design concepts and historical design styles relating to text and image interaction. Students will develop various types of graphic designs to include typography, color, illustration, symbols, and photography. Prior knowledge of Adobe InDesign and Photoshop is recommended, but not required, for this course. Adobe InDesign and Adobe Photoshop (Creative Suite 6 or Creative Cloud Complete) are required applications for those taking this course online. (Meets MnTC Goal 2 and Goal 6) (Prerequisites: none) (3 credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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Also Goal 2
ARTS1223*Introduction to the Digital Arts and Creative Multimedia (3 credits)
The purpose of this course is to develop in students an appreciation of creative multimedia and the digital arts as a vital element in understanding the human condition and to expose the students to various digital art forms. Students will explore the relationships between the artist, the artwork, the audience, and society. The students will engage in critical analysis of various forms of creative electronic multimedia, interdisciplinary arts, and the digital arts to help them form aesthetic judgments. Meets MnTC Goal 6. (Prerequisites: none) (3 credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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ARTS1425*Digital Photography (3 credits)
The course introduces the student to the art of digital photography, covering such topics as composition (pattern, symmetry, depth, texture, lines), perspective, black and white vs. color, light, close-ups, panoramas, etc. The course will explore approaches to photographing such subjects as landscapes, people, the built environment, plants and animals, weather phenomena, and still life objects. The focus will be on photography as a fine art, but some attention will be given to practical applications, such as photojournalism, commercial photography, freelance photography, and portraiture. The course will also cover technological basics, such as equipment purchase and maintenance, settings, and the like. Finally, the course will ask students to consider the work of great photographers past and present (including that of such figures as Edward Weston, Mathew Brady, Ansel Adams, James Presley Ball, and Imogen Cunningham). (MnTC Goal 6) (Prerequisite: none) (3 credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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ENGL1165Introduction to Literature (3 credits)
This course will serve to introduce the student to various aspects of literature, including its genres (fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction, and/or drama), its formal aesthetic elements (e.g. plot, metaphor, point of view, etc.), and its communication of ideas as they relate to the human condition. (Meets MnTC goal 6) (Prerequisite: A minimum score of 78 in the Reading Comprehension portion of the ACCUPLACER basic skills test or a minimum score of 21 in the Reading Subject area of the ACT test or successful completion of ENGL0528) (3 credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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Also Goal 7
ENGL1265*Multicultural Literature (3 credits)
This course will examine the diversity of North American culture through a varied body of literature produced by members of specific minority cultures within North America. The literature may include, but is not limited to, novels, short stories, memoirs, poetry, creative nonfiction, drama, and oral tradition. (Meets MnTC Goal 6 and Goal 7) (Prerequisites: A minimum score of 78 in the Reading Comprehension portion of the ACCUPLACER basic skills test, or a minimum score of 21 in the Reading Subject area of the ACT test, or successful completion of ENGL 0528) (3 credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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Also Goal 7
ENGL1445*Introduction to Creative Writing (3 credits)
This course will serve to introduce the student to the practice of creative writing, specifically to the techniques involved in writing poetry and short fiction. In addition to writing their own poems and stories, students will read and discuss a number of contemporary examples in these genres. (Meets MnTC goals 1 & 6) (Prerequisites: A minimum score of 78 on the Reading Comprehension portion of the ACCUPLACER basic skills test or a minimum score of 18 on the English subject area of the ACT test or successful completion of ENGL0528) (3 credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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Also Goal 1
ENGL2570*Poetry of the English Language (3 credits)
This course will serve to introduce the student to major poems and poets of the English language. Students will study the technical elements of poetry (e.g. meter, form, sound, metaphor) as well as its power, in the hands of its masters, to communicate important truths. (MnTC Goal 6) (Prerequisite: A minimum score of 78 in the Reading Comprehension portion of the ACCUPLACER basic skills test or a minimum score of 21 in the Reading Subject area of the ACT test or successful completion of ENGL0528) (3 credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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ENGL2580Independent Reading: The Great Books (3 credits)
Independent Reading: The Great Books allows students to choose books to read from a list provided by the instructor and discuss them in one-on-one meetings with the instructor and/or in small group meetings with other students and the instructor. The course may be conducted on campus or through electronic delivery (by discretion of instructor). The focus of the course will be on classic literary texts; however, books which are historical, political, philosophical, or representative of other disciplines may be used, though they should be ones accessible to skilled readers from outside those disciplines. Note: This course does not involve regular class meetings; rather, students must arrange meetings with the instructor. (MnTC Goals 2 and 6) (Prerequisite: A minimum score of 78 in the Reading Comprehension portion of the ACCUPLACER basic skills test or a minimum score of 21 in the Reading Subject area of the ACT test or successful completion of ENGL0528) (3 credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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Also Goal 2
ENGL2590Special Topics in Literature (3 credits)
This course will focus on a subcategory of literature-a particular genre, a particular time period, a particular author or group of authors, a particular cultural impact, or any combination of thereof-in each semester that it is offered. Offered irregularly. (Meets MnTC goal 6) (Prerequisite: A minimum score of 78 in the Reading Comprehension portion of the ACCUPLACER basic skills test or a minimum score of 21 in the Reading Subject area of the ACT test or successful completion of ENGL0528) (3 credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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HUMA1203Introduction to Music Theory (3 credits)
An introduction to the structure and notation of music for both the musician and non-musician to increase understanding and application of fundamentals in musicianship found in past and current compositions. Musical notation, pitch, scales, intervals, meter and rhythm, chords, form, and basic harmony will be covered. Students will develop the skills needed to read and write Western music. (MnTC Goal 6) (Prerequisite: none) (3 credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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HUMA1210*Introduction to Dance (3 credits)
Introduction to Dance is an exploration of the practice as an embodied form of inquiry and expression that lives within the interconnected worlds of ritual, social/ cultural and artistic practice. This survey course will allow students to analyze a survey of diverse dance forms within their cultural, historical, aesthetic, theoretical and personal contexts. (MnTC Goals 6 & 8) (Prerequisite: none) (3 credits: 2 lecture/1 lab)

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Also Goal 8
HUMA1430*Exploring World Cultures (3 credits)
This course provides an overview of various world cultures through aspects such as communication styles, religions, and family relationships. The arts of each selected country will be highlighted and related to their cultural traits and history. Students will learn some basic culture definitions (high/low context, power distance, gender roles) in order to look at their own culture as outsiders, appreciate the differences in other cultures, and gain some perspective on globalization. During the course, students will be encouraged to bring the information into their daily lives through personal experiences, news stories, and discussions. (MnTC Goals 6 and 8) (Prerequisite: none) (3 credits: 2 lecture/1 lab)

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Also Goal 8
HUMA1435*Multicultural America (3 credits)
In this course students will study, analyze, and discuss literary, cinematic, and other artistic or cultural works about multicultural American experience. Students will have opportunities to explore the historical context in which these works were produced, as well as the literary, cinematic or artistic aspects of their style, theme, language, and structure. (MnTC Goals 6 & 7) (Prerequisite: none) (3 credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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Also Goal 7
HUMA1445*Introduction to Women's Studies (3 credits)
This course primarily looks at literary works, films, and other artistic and cultural artifacts, such as oral story-telling, visual arts, and performances, to examine how artists represent womens experiences from a historical and cross-cultural perspective. With a combination of class activities such as lectures, discussions, response papers, and projects, this course hopes to broaden students' understanding on how gender issues impact women's (and men's) lives across race, class, ethnic, national, and religious boundaries. (MnTC Goals 6 & 8) (Prerequisite: none) (3 credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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Also Goal 8
MUSC1103*Introduction to Music (3 credits)
The course offers an approach that emphasizes the progressive development of listening skills and an appreciation of music as an expression of the human condition. Students are introduced to music elements through simpler music styles and familiar recordings and gradually build up to the most rigorous forms of music. The structure of the course provides the skills necessary to listen to all music with knowledge and sophistication. Goals and reflections become increasingly sophisticated as students progress through the course, resulting in progressive development of their listening skills, active vocabulary, elements of music, and significant terms. Students will be required to attend music concerts. (Meets MnTC Goal 6) (Prerequisite: none) (3 credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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MUSC1203*Introduction to Music Theory (3 credits)
An introduction to the structure and notation of music for both the musician and non-musician to increase understanding and application of fundamentals in musicianship found in past and current compositions. Musical notation, pitch, scales, intervals, meter and rhythm, chords, form, and basic harmony will be covered. Students will develop the skills needed to read and write Western music. (MnTC Goal 6) (Prerequisite: none) (3 credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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MUSC1211*Popular Music in American Society (3 credits)
This course surveys the history of American popular music from the 1950s to the present. The course examines the development of various music styles, such as rock and hip-hop, and explores the relationship between cultural trends and popular music. Notable recordings and musicians will be studied. Attendance at one concert is required. (MnTC Goals 6 & 7) (Prerequisite: none) (3 credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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Also Goal 7
MUSC1213*World Music (3 credits)
The course is a survey of musical-cultural practices of various ethnic peoples of the world. This course is designed to study sound and music in human life and society as a cultural expression, aand how musical meaning is produced. (MnTC Goals 6 & 8) (Prerequisite: none) (3 credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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Also Goal 8
PHIL1210*Moral Problems (3 credits)
An introduction to ethical principles as applied to the moral issues and challenges individuals encounter in everyday life. Emphasis will be given to the analysis and development of ethical views and decision making. A broad variety of topics will be explored, including personal moral character, medical, religious, racial, and cultural issues. (Fulfills MnTC Goals 6 & 9) (Prerequisite: None) (3 credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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Also Goal 9
SPAN1230*Introduction to Hispanic Cultures (3 credits)
Taught in English, Intro to Hispanic Cultures will acquaint the students with the concepts of culture and cultural identity, and bring them an awareness of the skills necessary to achieve successful cross-cultural communication, especially as it pertains to work with Hispanic clients. Students will compare and contrast their own culture with that of Spanish-speaking peoples. The course will also look at the "high" culture and civilization of Spanish-speaking countries, examining the arts, history, architecture, and literature. (MnTC Goals 6 & 8) (Prerequisite: None) (3 credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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Also Goal 8

Goal 7: Human Diversity

To increase students' understanding of individual and group differences (e.g. race, gender, class) and their knowledge of the traditions and values of various groups in the United States. Students should be able to evaluate the United States' historical and contemporary responses to group differences.
You need at least one 3-credit course to meet Goal 7.
Goal 7 Courses (3 credits)
COMM1228*Interpersonal Communications (3 credits)
This course focuses on the practical and theoretical interpersonal communication skills needful in the personal, public, and professional contexts found within a diverse society. This course addresses subject matter, such as communication theory, verbal and non-verbal communication, intercultural and cultural communication, communication modes, communication styles, the language of conflict management/resolution, active listening, language choice, and perception. (Meets MnTC Goal 1 and Goal 7) (Prerequisites: A minimum score of 78 in the Reading Comprehension portion of the Accuplacer Basic Skills test, or a minimum score of 21 in the Reading Subject area of the ACT test, or successful completion of ENGL 0528) (3 credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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Also Goal 1
ENGL1165Introduction to Literature (3 credits)
This course will serve to introduce the student to various aspects of literature, including its genres (fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction, and/or drama), its formal aesthetic elements (e.g. plot, metaphor, point of view, etc.), and its communication of ideas as they relate to the human condition. (Meets MnTC goal 6) (Prerequisite: A minimum score of 78 in the Reading Comprehension portion of the ACCUPLACER basic skills test or a minimum score of 21 in the Reading Subject area of the ACT test or successful completion of ENGL0528) (3 credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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Also Goal 6
ENGL1265*Multicultural Literature (3 credits)
This course will examine the diversity of North American culture through a varied body of literature produced by members of specific minority cultures within North America. The literature may include, but is not limited to, novels, short stories, memoirs, poetry, creative nonfiction, drama, and oral tradition. (Meets MnTC Goal 6 and Goal 7) (Prerequisites: A minimum score of 78 in the Reading Comprehension portion of the ACCUPLACER basic skills test, or a minimum score of 21 in the Reading Subject area of the ACT test, or successful completion of ENGL 0528) (3 credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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Also Goal 6
HIST1108U.S. History to 1865 (3 credits)
HIST 1108 is a history of the political, social, economic, and cultural history of the United States to 1865. This class will discuss the development of the United States and the interactions of different peoples and groups. Even more importantly, this course will offer historical perspectives into the formation of todays society as we discuss how political, social, economic, cultural, and technological changes have impacted both the past and the present. (Meets MnTC Goals 5 & 7). (Prerequisites: none) (3 credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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Also Goal 5
HIST1110*U.S. History: 1865 to Present (3 credits)
The objectives for this course will be to give the student a broader and deeper understanding of American history from the end of the Civil War in 1865 to the present day. Even more importantly, this course will offer historical perspectives into the formation of todays society as we discuss how political, social, economic, cultural, and technological changes have impacted both the past and the present. (MnTC goals 5 & 7) (Prerequisite: none) (3 credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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Also Goal 5
HIST2515American Music History (3 credits)
American music history will focus on the economic and social changes that have shaped and also been shaped by the nation¿s unique musical history. As each era¿s music reveals many of the most significant changes of our history, a study of the varying musical styles will give insight into the complexity of our multicultural American past. This class will examine how the music of each era is symbolic of the historical circumstances of the time. Students will be able to describe the musical styles of the time periods and also the historical factors associated with the music. (MnTC goals 5 & 7) (Prerequisite: None) (3 credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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Also Goal 5
HIST2535History of the American Indian (3 credits)
This course will investigate the inhabitants of continental America before, during, and after the arrival of Europeans. An in-depth analysis of different Indian societies and how they were affected by their environment, social, economic, and political realities of their time. Students will look at their own pre-knowledge of Indian societies and will check it for misconceptions or generalizations that may or may not be true. Students will also learn to research and investigate historical topics related to American Indians through the use of historical research techniques. (Meets MnTC Goals 5 & 7) (Prerequisties: None) (3 credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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Also Goal 5
HUMA1435*Multicultural America (3 credits)
In this course students will study, analyze, and discuss literary, cinematic, and other artistic or cultural works about multicultural American experience. Students will have opportunities to explore the historical context in which these works were produced, as well as the literary, cinematic or artistic aspects of their style, theme, language, and structure. (MnTC Goals 6 & 7) (Prerequisite: none) (3 credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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Also Goal 6
MUSC1211*Popular Music in American Society (3 credits)
This course surveys the history of American popular music from the 1950s to the present. The course examines the development of various music styles, such as rock and hip-hop, and explores the relationship between cultural trends and popular music. Notable recordings and musicians will be studied. Attendance at one concert is required. (MnTC Goals 6 & 7) (Prerequisite: none) (3 credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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Also Goal 6
PSYC1110*Introduction to Psychology (3 credits)
Psychology applies to everyone's personal and workplace daily life. In this course, you will be introduced to the history of psychology, consciousness, learning theories, memory, problem-solving, intelligence, motivation, life-span development, personality, abnormal psychology and therapy. (Fulfills MnTC Goal 5 & 7) (Prerequisite: none) (3 credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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Also Goal 5
PSYC1115*Lifespan Development (3 credits)
Students will explore theories of human development to understand the connections and relationships of stages of growth from conception to late adulthood. Genetics; prenatal development and birth; physical, cognitive and psychosocial development from birth through late adulthood; and dying, death, and bereavement will be examined. (Fulfills MnTC Goals 5 and 7) (Prerequisite: none) (3 credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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Also Goal 5
PSYC2526*Abnormal Psychology (3 credits)
Abnormal Psychology explores in greater depth the psychological disorders that are introduced in General Psychology. Students will examine diagnostic criteria, etiology, prevalence rates, age of onset, and treatments for psychological disorders included in the DSM-V. Social, ethical, cultural, and legal issues that are relevant to the mental health field will also be discussed. (Meets MnTC Goals 5 & 7) (Prerequisite: PSYC1110 Introduction to Psychology) (3 credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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Also Goal 5
PSYC2531*Social Psychology (3 credits)
This course provides learners with an introduction to the scientific study of how a person's emotions, thoughts, and behaviors are influenced by other people. Students will become familiar with theories, research methods, and applications of social psychology to their own lives. Among the issues to be addressed are group processes, aggression, conformity, attraction, attitude change, and prejudice. Findings regarding gender, racial, and cultural similarities and differences will be covered as well. (Fulfills MnTC Goals 5 and 7) (Prerequisite: PSYC1110 Introduction to Psychology or SOCS1110 Introduction to Sociology) (3 credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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Also Goal 5
SOCS1110*Introduction to Sociology (3 credits)
The purpose of this course is to develop in students an understanding of basic sociological issues, concepts, terminology, and applications of these understandings with current societal events. Students will become conscious of societal influences in relationship to human and cultural dynamics in our world. This course will call for the development of reflective and critical thinking skills. (MnTC Goal 5) (Prerequisite: none) (3 credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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Also Goal 5
SOCS1205*Sociology of the Family (3 credits)
The purpose of this course is to offer a comprehensive study of the forces external to and within the contemporary Western social institution that we call 'the family'. Current sociological theories and research will be used to study American family structure and functions. Cross-cultural comparisons; family dynamics; disorganization; and change will be included. The course will provide a forum to expose the students to the vast changes that have taken and continue to take place in marriages and family enabling them to make choices in a diverse society. (MnTC Goals 5 & 7) (Prerequisite: none) (3 credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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Also Goal 5

Goal 8: Global Perspective

To increase students' understanding of the growing interdependence of nations and peoples and develop their ability to apply a comparative perspective to cross-cultural social, economic and political experiences.
You need at least one 3-credit course to meet Goal 8.
Goal 8 Courses (3 credits)
GEOG1115*World Regional Geography (3 credits)
This course will present an introduction to the physical, economic, political, cultural, and demographic characteristics of world regions. Particular emphasis is placed on spatial (geographic) relationships and principles that impact the formation of economies and cultures, on settlement and land use patterns, population distribution, commerce and industry, language, religion, and political alliances. (MnTC Goals 5 and 8) (Prerequisite: none) (3 credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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Also Goal 5
HIST1105*Western Civilization to 1500 (3 credits)
This course will investigate the beginnings of Western Civilization through the Renaissance and explore the creation and development of its social, political, economic, and philosophical traditions. A variety of topics and areas will be discussed which could include earliest civilizations, Hebrews, Greeks, Romans, and medieval Europe. Students will learn about how unique development by these societies has shaped and formed our current society today. (Meets MnTC Goals 5 & 8) (Prerequisites: none) (3 credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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Also Goal 5
HIST1230*World Civilization: 1500 CE - Present (3 credits)
HIST1230 presents a history of political, social, economic, and cultural history of the world from 1500 to present. This class will discuss the development of the worlds civilizations and the interactions of different peoples and societies. The class will look at how the worlds history has shaped not only our own history but also how the world has moved toward a more interdependent present. (Meets MnTC Goals 5 & 8) (Prerequisites: none) (3 credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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Also Goal 5
HUMA1210*Introduction to Dance (3 credits)
Introduction to Dance is an exploration of the practice as an embodied form of inquiry and expression that lives within the interconnected worlds of ritual, social/ cultural and artistic practice. This survey course will allow students to analyze a survey of diverse dance forms within their cultural, historical, aesthetic, theoretical and personal contexts. (MnTC Goals 6 & 8) (Prerequisite: none) (3 credits: 2 lecture/1 lab)

Download the Course Outline

Also Goal 6
HUMA1430*Exploring World Cultures (3 credits)
This course provides an overview of various world cultures through aspects such as communication styles, religions, and family relationships. The arts of each selected country will be highlighted and related to their cultural traits and history. Students will learn some basic culture definitions (high/low context, power distance, gender roles) in order to look at their own culture as outsiders, appreciate the differences in other cultures, and gain some perspective on globalization. During the course, students will be encouraged to bring the information into their daily lives through personal experiences, news stories, and discussions. (MnTC Goals 6 and 8) (Prerequisite: none) (3 credits: 2 lecture/1 lab)

Download the Course Outline

Also Goal 6
HUMA1445*Introduction to Women's Studies (3 credits)
This course primarily looks at literary works, films, and other artistic and cultural artifacts, such as oral story-telling, visual arts, and performances, to examine how artists represent womens experiences from a historical and cross-cultural perspective. With a combination of class activities such as lectures, discussions, response papers, and projects, this course hopes to broaden students' understanding on how gender issues impact women's (and men's) lives across race, class, ethnic, national, and religious boundaries. (MnTC Goals 6 & 8) (Prerequisite: none) (3 credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

Download the Course Outline

Also Goal 6
MUSC1213*World Music (3 credits)
The course is a survey of musical-cultural practices of various ethnic peoples of the world. This course is designed to study sound and music in human life and society as a cultural expression, aand how musical meaning is produced. (MnTC Goals 6 & 8) (Prerequisite: none) (3 credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

Download the Course Outline

Also Goal 6
SPAN1230*Introduction to Hispanic Cultures (3 credits)
Taught in English, Intro to Hispanic Cultures will acquaint the students with the concepts of culture and cultural identity, and bring them an awareness of the skills necessary to achieve successful cross-cultural communication, especially as it pertains to work with Hispanic clients. Students will compare and contrast their own culture with that of Spanish-speaking peoples. The course will also look at the "high" culture and civilization of Spanish-speaking countries, examining the arts, history, architecture, and literature. (MnTC Goals 6 & 8) (Prerequisite: None) (3 credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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Also Goal 6
SPAN1240Beginning Spanish I (4 credits)
Beginning Spanish is for students with little or no prior training, or for those wishing to refresh other skills in Spanish. Instruction in speaking, listening, reading, writing, and culture will occur through practice in and out of the class session. (Meets MnTC Goal 8) (Prerequisite: None) (4 credits: 4 lecture/0 lab)

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Goal 9: Ethical/Civic Resp

To develop students' capacity to identify, discuss, and reflect upon the ethical dimensions of political, social, and personal life and to understand the ways in which they can exercise responsible and productive citizenship. While there are diverse views of social justice or the common good in a pluralistic society, students should learn that responsible citizenship requires them to develop skills to understand their own and others' positions, be part of the free exchange of ideas, and function as public-minded citizens.
You need at least one 3-credit course to meet Goal 9.
Goal 9 Courses (3 credits)
CHEM1225Introduction to Forensic Science (3 credits)
This chemistry course will explore the scientific basis and background for crime-scene investigations. Students will explore the entire field of forensic science, including the different kinds of physical evidence, collection, preservation, and proper analysis of evidence, current technologies and techniques used to examine evidence, interpretation of results from a variety of forensic-laboratory analyses, and the ethical implications of using forensic data in a case. Students will perform several laboratory experiments to learn some data analysis techniques. (Meets MnTC Goals 3 & 9) (Prerequisite: none) (3 credits: 2 lecture/1 lab)

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Also Goal 3
COMM1420*Social Media Communications (3 credits)
This course explores the ways in which social media influences interactions among people in the digital realm. Students will create content using a variety of common social media applications and multi-media, including online writing, listening, and speaking. Students will investigate the development of online communities and increase their knowledge of online rhetoric, the use of analytic tools for audience research and engagement, planning for media events, and evaluation of social media applications. Students will identify, discuss, and reflect upon the ethical dimensions of political, social, and personal life and the ways in which they can exercise responsible and productive citizenship. Meets MnTC Goals 1 & 9. (Prerequisite: none) (3 credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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Also Goal 1
ECON1405*Personal Finance (3 credits)
Personal Finance offers a study of economic decisions facing individuals in their personal lives. The course includes such topics as budgeting, using consumer credit, buying or renting a home, providing for medical care, purchasing life insurance, understanding retirement programs, buying and selling stocks, preparing income tax returns, minimizing taxes, and thinking about consumerism. (Prerequisites: none) (MnTC Goals 5 and 9) (3 credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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Also Goal 5
PHIL1210*Moral Problems (3 credits)
An introduction to ethical principles as applied to the moral issues and challenges individuals encounter in everyday life. Emphasis will be given to the analysis and development of ethical views and decision making. A broad variety of topics will be explored, including personal moral character, medical, religious, racial, and cultural issues. (Fulfills MnTC Goals 6 & 9) (Prerequisite: None) (3 credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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Also Goal 6
POLS1101*Introduction to Political Science (3 credits)
An introduction to the basic terms, concepts, principles, and structures of modern political systems worldwide. Problems and issues arising from various political systems, such as democracy, communism, socialism, and totalitarianism will also be studied. (Fulfills MnTC Goals 5 & 9) (Prerequisite: none) (3 credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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Also Goal 5
POLS1120*American Government (3 credits)
A survey of the basic structure and operation of the American National Government, with emphasis on the core ideas and values that underlie it. Topics will include citizen participation, political parties, interest groups, the Presidency, Congress, and Federal Courts. (Fulfills MN Transfer Curriculum Goals 5 & 9) (Prerequisite: none) (3 credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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Also Goal 5
PSYC1223*Psychology of Death and Dying (3 credits)
This course examines death and dying in terms of current and historical viewpoints and the effect of individual and cultural attitudes and rituals. Medicolegal movements and issues, and factors such as age, culture, spirituality, and manner of death will be investigated and how those issues shape end-of-life and grief experiences. (Fulfills MnTC Goals 5 and 9) (Prerequisite: none) (3 credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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Also Goal 5
PSYC2522*Positive Psychology (3 credits)
This course explores theories and research on positive human qualities and strengths, and how to utilize these for personal and community well-being. The interaction of psychological, sociological, and biological factors that shape well-being are discussed. The information in this course will be applied toward life areas such as work, leisure, relationships, health, and society. (MnTC Goals 5 and 9) (Prerequisite: PSYC1110 General Psychology) (3 credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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Also Goal 5

Goal 10: People/Environment

To improve students' understanding of today's complex environmental challenges. Students will examine the interrelatedness of human society and the natural environment. Knowledge of both bio-physical principles and socio-cultural systems is the foundation for integrative and critical thinking about environmental issues.
You need at least one 3-credit course to meet Goal 10.
Goal 10 Courses (3 credits)
BIOL1120*Environmental Science (3 credits)
Environmental Science introduces the relationship between human populations and their surroundings through the use of course assignments, discussions, virtual labs and/or lab like experiences. Students explore core scientific concepts and the impact of past, present, and future human behavior on the environment. An emphasis is placed on how current practices, policies, and individual behavior impact both the local and global environment. (Meets MnTC goals 3 & 10) (Prerequisite: none) (3 Credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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Also Goal 3
BIOL1201*Introduction to Biology (4 credits)
Introduction to Biology will serve as an overview of the principles and theories that drive the study of biology. Students will be exposed to several different disciplines within biology, including but not limited to, molecular and cell biology, genetics, evolutionary biology, and ecology. An emphasis will be placed on relationships between biology and current issues of particular interest to students. (Meets MnTC Goals 3 & 10) (Prerequisite: none) (4 Credits: 3 lecture/1 lab)

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Also Goal 3
CHEM1122Environmental Chemistry (3 credits)
Environmental Chemistry introduces non-science students to the world of chemical processes, both natural and artificial, in their daily experiences. These phenomenon are related to current environmental issues in the context of human activities and influences. Topics discussed include air pollution, ozone depletion, global warming, acid rain, nuclear power issues, energy sources and the impact recycling has on our environment. (Meets MnTC Goals 3 & 10) (Prerequisite: none) (3 credits: 2 lecture/1 lab)

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Also Goal 3
HIST2525*Minnesota History (3 credits)
This course is a survey of Minnesota's historical development from the pre-Columbian period to the present. It focuses on the historic importance of Minnesota's geography and natural resources, American Indian-white relations, the development of Minnesota's unique political tradition, and the emergence of Minnesota's diverse society and economy. (MnTC Goal 5 & 10) (Prerequisites: None) (3 credits: 3 lecture/0 lab)

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Also Goal 5

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