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Fall Semester Diversity Speakers Dates

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Fall Semester Diversity Speakers Dates

Topic: "Is America Really Post Racial"
Date: Monday, September 21, 2009 – Auditorium (SE TECH Winona campus)
– 2:00 p.m.
Guest Speaker: Bakari Kitwana

Post-Racial America? Tour Answers Obama's Call For Nationwide Discussion

Critically-acclaimed author and hip-hop activist Bakari Kitwana partners with the Harvard University Law School-based think tank The Jamestown Project to announce a national tour that seeks to answer the question, "Is America Really Post-Racial?"

Kitwana, the moderator of these discussions, is co-founder of the first ever National Hip-Hop Political Convention. His book The Hip-Hop Generation: Young Blacks and the Crisis in African American Culture has been adopted as a course book at over 100 colleges and universities across the country. The 2007-2008 Artist-in-Residence at the Center for the Study of Race, Politics and Culture at the University of Chicago, Kitwana has been acknowledged as an expert on youth culture and hip-hop politics by CNN, Fox News, CNBC, BET and other leading news outlets. His writings have appeared in the Village Voice, The New York Times, The Nation, and the Boston Globe. Hip-Hop Activism in the Obama Era is his most recent book.

Topic: Human Rights Forum
Date: Thursday, September 24, 2009 - East Hall
Winona State Campus – 11:00 a.m.
Guest Facilitators: Commissioner Velma Korbel, Mr. Mario Hernandez and
Dr. Wayne Ripley

The forum will focus on the national origin and religion provisions of the Minnesota Human Rights Act, and examine how building inclusive communities can help eliminate discrimination in Minnesota. Audience members will have an opportunity during the forum to ask questions of panelists and share human rights concerns in their community.

Mrs. Velma Korbel, Commissioner, Minnesota Department of Human Rights  was named Commissioner of the Department of Human Rights by Governor Tim Pawlenty in January 2003. "Velma Korbel has spent a lifetime in the trenches fighting for equal opportunity and justice," said Governor Pawlenty in announcing her appointment. "She has a reputation for fairness and reaching out. Velma also has a track record for strengthening equal opportunity and anti-discrimination programs in times of budget challenges.

Mr. Mario Hernandez is in the Legislative & Community Affairs division at the Minnesota Department of Human Rights.

Dr. Wayne 'Chuck' Ripley is an Assistant Professor in the English Department at Winona State University and Chair of the Winona Human Rights Commission. Professor Ripley was a Peace Corps Volunteer in Chuuk, Micronesia from 1994 to 1996 and an election supervisor in Bosnia in the spring of 1997. 

Hispanic Heritage Month

Topic: The American Dream: "Inspiring Others Through His Amazing
Story of Resilience, Perseverance and Optimism"
Date: Tuesday, October 6, 2009 – Auditorium (SE TECH Winona campus)
– 11:00 a.m.
Guest Speaker: JR Martinez

JR Martinez was born in Shreveport, LA on June 14, 1983 to Maria Zavala. He faced many goals as a young man growing up without a father. To this day he has never met his father. This left a young boy to face the difficulties of teenage life without the love and guidance of a male role model in his life. Even so, he managed to overcome these barriers and stay on the right path. He enlisted in the United States Army in September 2002 and underwent Basic and Advanced Training at Fort Benning, Georgia where he gained skills as an 11-B Infantryman, after reporting to Fort Campbell in January of 2003, he was assigned to his unit; 2/5/02 Delta Company. J.R. didn't have to worry about getting bored in the military. He was deployed to Iraq in March of that same year. Less than a month later, on April 5, 2003, J.R. was driving a Humvee when his left front tire hit a landmine. He suffered severe burns to more than 40% of his body as well as smoke inhalation. He was then evacuated to Landstuhl, Germany for immediate care. Eventually Martinez arrived at Brooke Army Medical Center (BAMC) in San Antonio, TX to begin his road to recovery. Never did he realize what a long road it would be. J.R. spent 34 months at BAMC, undergoing 32 different surgeries, including skin grafts and cosmetic surgery.

After his recovery J.R. inspires the lives of others through his amazing story of resilience, perseverance and optimism which he can do in Spanish and English. While his experience is certainly life-changing, amazingly J.R. claims this is actually a change for the better. He's discovered it's what's inside a person that matters most and devotes himself to showing others the true value in making the most of every situation. Due to his positive attitude J.R. has spoken to over 450 groups across the country. His audiences include a wide range of groups, including Tony Robbins seminars, national business conferences, Churches, veterans groups, civic groups, sporting events, schools and many other public and private organizations.

He's made hundreds of broadcast appearances as well as been interviewed by hundreds of print and online reporters about his war experiences and his personal road to recovery. J.R. has appeared on major networks such as ABC, MSNBC, CBS, FOX News, The Oprah Winfrey Show, Deborah Norville Show, Univision, Good Morning America and NBC, been featured in the Washington Post, New York Times, Associated Press, Yahoo and most recent People Magazine. J.R.'s passion is to impact people in a positive manner by his inspiring message that every dream can be fulfilled by hard work & perseverance.

National Coming Out Day

Topic: One More River to Cross: The Intersections of Race, Religion and
Sexual Orientation
Date: Monday, October 12, 2009 – Auditorium (SE TECH Winona campus)
– 11:00 a.m.
Guest Speaker: Rev. Dr. Jamie Washington, President,
Washington Consulting Group

Rev. Dr. Jamie Washington serves as the President and Founder of the Washington Consulting Group, a Multicultural Organizational Development Firm based in Baltimore, MD. He is also a senior consultant with The Equity Consulting Group of California, and Elsie Y. Cross and Associates out of Philadelphia. Dr. Washington has served as an educator and administrator in higher education for over 20 years. He most recently served as the Assistant Vice President for Student Affairs at the University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC). He has been an instructor in Sociology, American Studies and Education, and an Assistant Professor of Women's Studies at UMBC. As a native Philadelphian, Dr. Washington earned his B.S. degree in Therapeutic Recreation and Music from Slippery Rock State College, and a double Masters' of Science degree from Indiana University/Bloomington in Higher Education Administration and Counseling, with a concentration in Human Sexuality. He holds a Ph.D. is in College Student Development, with a concentration in Multicultural Education from the University of Maryland College Park. Dr. Washington completed his Master of Divinity program at Howard University School of Divinity in May of 2004.

Dr. Washington has held leadership positions in ACPA, NASPA, ACHUO-I, MACUHO, MCPA, APA, NGLTF, The Campaign to End Homophobia and the National Black Lesbian and Gay Leadership Forum. Dr. Washington is a Lead faculty member with the Leader Shape Institute and the National Certified Student Leader Program, a member of Omicron Delta Kappa, Golden Key, Alpha Phi Omega, Phi Delta Kappa, education Honorary, and a Life member of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity Incorporated. He has over 30 years of experience in music ministry, is an ordained minister and currently serves as an Associate Minister at Unity Fellowship Church of Baltimore. Rev. Dr. Washington sees himself as an instrument of change. He works everyday to help people find the best in themselves and others.

Disability and Alcohol Awareness

Topic: In the Blink of An Eye
Date: Monday, October 26, 2009 – Tentatively Room 314
(SE TECH Red Wing campus) – 11:00 a.m.
Guest Speaker: Mr. Marcus Engel

Marcus' stunning and honest account of the fight of his life. From average college student one minute, to clinging to life in a hospital bed the next, Marcus takes audiences deep inside his recovery after being blinded by a drunk driver. Audiences will experience the pain, frustration and loss that can happen in an instant, all due to one preventable mistake. Beyond your typical alcohol awareness presentation, Marcus blends an unforgettable Prevention message with significant amounts of humor, tips and insights for audiences to use to overcome adversity in their own lives.

Marcus Engel lived these horrific moments… but that is only the beginning of the story. On a cold autumn night during his freshman year of college, Marcus' life took a dramatic turn. Following a Saturday night hockey game, Marcus and some friends were headed to a local diner for a midnight snack. They never made it. As the carload of teenagers pulled into a busy intersection, a drunk driver traveling at twice the speed limit slammed broadside into the small Toyota; only a thin piece of metal separated Marcus from the full impact of the oncoming vehicle.

When he awoke to a world he would never again see, Marcus faced seemingly insurmountable obstacles: survive hundreds of hours of reconstructive facial surgery, adapt to blindness and find happiness in a world changed forever. While still restricted to a hospital bed, a feeding tube and respirator, Marcus set his goal: return to college as quickly as possible. This goal would sustain him through two years of medical recovery, a six-month stint at rehab school and one month training with a new Seeing Eye dog. Not only did Marcus accept and embrace the challenge, but the life lessons he learned are now the guiding forces that inspire hundreds of thousands every day.

Marcus' story has empowered, enlightened and entertained audiences around the nation to overcome personal adversity and make intelligent decisions. His autobiography, After This… An Inspirational Journey for All the Wrong Reasons has helped tens of thousands realize their potential and reach for new goals.  His latest book The Other End of the Stethoscope is an inspirational tribute to health care professionals, offering insight and strategies for excellent patient care.

Native/Alaskan American Heritage Month

Topic: Black Indians: A Hidden Heritage
Date: Monday, November 16, 2009 – Tentatively Room 314
(SE TECH Red Wing campus) – 11:00 a.m.
Guest Speaker: Dr. William Loren Katz

Though they have never appeared in a school text, Hollywood movie or a TV show of the Old West, Black Indians were there as sure as Sitting Bull, Davy Crockett and Geronimo. Their story began at the time of Columbus, ranged from North American forests to South American jungles, and the jewel-like islands of the Caribbean. The first freedom paths taken by runaway slaves led to Native American villages. There black men and women found a red hand of friendship and an accepting adoption system and culture. The sturdy offspring of Black-Indian marriages shaped the early days of the fur trade, added a new dimension to frontier diplomacy, and made a daring contribution to the fight for American liberty. Early Florida history was determined by a powerful alliance that fought the U.S. Army, Navy and Marines to a standstill for forty years.

Like other intrepid frontier people, these dark Americans braved every peril for a slice of the American Dream—freedom, a safe home, family happiness and a piece of one's own land. In the chronicles of the Americas their long, arduous quest for freedom is still a neglected chapter. Through careful research and rare antique prints and photographs, this book reveals how black and red people learned to live and work together in the Americas to oppose white oppression. Here is an American story that reveals a little-known aspect of our past and shatters some myths.

Author, Historian & Educator
After graduating from Syracuse University with a BA in history in 1950 and from New York University in 1952 with an MA in Secondary Education, Katz taught social studies in New York City and State secondary schools and served as a curriculum consultant for 14 years. Since 1967 he has been a lecturer and consultant for Boards of Education from Seattle, Washington to Dade County, Florida, including the Inner London Education Authority and the Education Departments of North Carolina and New York.

Since 1968, he has been interviewed on Gil Noble's award-winning television program Like It Is. He has also appeared on NBC's The Today Show, PBS's Tony Brown's Journal and many other major network television programs. He has hosted his own history interview program on WBAI-FM on Pacifica Radio in New York City and since 1986 has served as the station's Historian in Residence. He is often interviewed on Native American, African American and National Public Radio stations across the country. He has spoken on the much overlooked alliance that has been shaped by Africans and Indigenous Americans for more than 500 years.

Since 1986 his "Education and Books" column has appeared in the New York Daily Challenge. His essays have also appeared in The New York Times, American Legacy Magazine and Web sites, The Black World Today and Global Black News. William Katz has been consultant to the Smithsonian Institute, a committee of the British House of Commons and a committee of the US Senate. He has served as a Scholar-in-Residence at Teachers College, Columbia University and at New York University.

 

H1N1 Influenza Resources

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Update January 11, 2010

Reported cases of H1N1 Remain low on all campuses. As the new semester starts, please continue to protect yourself as another wave of H1N1 could occur over the next several months.

What can I do to protect myself from getting sick?

  • Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue every time you cough or sneeze.
  • If you don’t have a tissue, sneeze or cough into your sleeve.
  • Wash hands often with soap and water or an alcohol‐based hand cleaner.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose or mouth.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick, if possible.
  • Stay healthy: eat nutritious foods, get enough sleep, and exercise.

---

Update November 11, 2009The College's emergency response team continues to monitor reported H1N1 cases on all campuses. Reported cases currently remain low on all campuses.

Update October 7, 2009

Q."How do I know by my symptoms if I have a common cold or the seasonal flu"?

A. Because both the common cold and seasonal flu are respiratory illnesses caused by different viruses, many of the symptoms are similar. The table below provides an easy reference and will help identify the key differences.

Symptoms

Common Cold

Seasonal Flu

Runny or stuffy nose

Common

Occasionally

Itchy or sore throat

Common

Occasionally

Cough

Mild

Common,
Chest discomfort

Congestion

Common

Sometimes

Sneezing

Sometimes

Sometimes

Watery eyes

Sometimes

Rarely

Fever

Rare, Low-grade

102+ F, Frequently

Fatigue/Tiredness

Mild

Common, 2-3 weeks

Headache

Rare, Mild

Common

Body Aches

Rare, Mild

Common, severe

Diarrhea

No

Sometimes

Vomiting

No

Sometimes

Chills

N

Common

 

 

Common Cold

Seasonal Flu

Length of Illness

Symptoms for 4-10 days

7 days with fatigue potentially lasting several weeks

Incubation Period
(Time before symptoms appear)

1-3 days of coming in contact w/ virus

2-5 days of coming in contact w/ virus

Contagious
(Time to avoid ppl)

First 3 days you
have symptoms

1 day before symptoms show, up to 5 days after

Flu Spreads
(Tips and tricks to catching flu/cold)

Touching eyes, mouth, nose after making contact (touching contaminated object) with virus (droplets from spit, coughing)

Touching eyes, mouth, nose after making contact (touching contaminated object) with virus (droplets from spit, coughing)

Virus Survival
(Length of time virus lives on objects)

Up to 3-4 hours outside the body on skin or objects...

Up to a couple of days, depending on the surface!

 

Seasonal Flu vs. H1N1

 

Seasonal Flu

H1N1 Flu

Fever

Fever

Coughing and/or sore throat

Coughing and/or sore throat

Runny or stuffy nose

Runny or stuffy nose

Headaches and/or body aches

Headaches and/or body aches

Chills

Chills

Fatigue

Fatigue

 

Vomiting

 

Diarrhea

*Although you can have H1N1 without having the additional symptoms, the final 2 are often indicative of the illness.

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Update: September 17, 2009

Dear Minnesota State College -Southeast Technical Community,

The college is taking steps to help prevent the spread of flu within our community and we need your help in accomplishing this goal. We now have reported cases of H1N1 flu on the Winona campus and the college continues to encourage students, faculty, and staff to report absences resulting from conditions with flu like symptoms to the appropriate person.

Minnesota State College-Southeast Technical is promoting prevention and awareness on both the Red Wing and Winona campuses and is offering seasonal flu vaccinations for faculty and staff at the Winona Campus on Wednesday, September 23rd in room 300 from 11:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. and at the Red Wing Campus on Monday, October 19th in room 102 from 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

We will also be offering seasonal flu shots to students at the Winona Campus Student Center, Wednesday Sept 30 from 8:00am-3:00pm, Thursday Oct 1 from 8:00am-3:00pm and Friday Oct 2 from 8:00am-2pm and at the Red Wing Campus Student Center, Thursday Oct 1 10:00am-2pm and Friday Oct 2 from 9:00am-1:00pm. The cost will be $10.00.

In addition, we have created a link on our college website with more information:

http://www.southeastmn.edu/h1n1info.aspx

We will continue to update the college community as we receive new information. Going forward, we remind everyone about individual measures all of us can take to help prevent or slow the spread of flu.

What can I do to protect myself from getting sick?

  • Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue every time you cough or sneeze.
  • If you don’t have a tissue, sneeze or cough into your sleeve.
  • Wash hands often with soap and water or an alcohol‐based hand cleaner.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose or mouth.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick, if possible.
  • Stay healthy: eat nutritious foods, get enough sleep, and exercise.

---

Update: September 11, 2009

 H1N1 Staff Presentation Adobe Acrobat

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Minnesota Department of Health

http://www.health.state.mn.us/divs/idepc/diseases/flu/h1n1/index.html

Center for Disease Control

http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/

Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy (University of Minnesota)

http://www.cidrap.umn.edu/